Little Tong Noodle Shop – Yunnan by the Way of East Village

little pot mixian bowl with a side of tea eggs

The Chinese food scene in NYC continues to evolve beyond Sichuan and Cantonese. Now we can add to the mix Yunnan, a region in Southwest China known for its spice and produce. Little Tong Noodle Shop, a new restaurant in the East Village run by Chef Simone Tong, an alum of wd-50, highlights the flavors of this region, showcasing specifically mixian, a savory rice noodle dish.Read More

Pinch Chinese in Soho

saturday night at pinch chinese

When you hear that a former executive chef of Din Tai Fung is making soup dumplings in Soho, you run, not walk, to that restaurant as soon as possible. While the soup dumpling scene in New York is improving, nothing quite compares to Din Tai Fung, and since we’re not getting a NYC branch anytime soon, I figured this might be the next best thing. We dropped by Pinch Chinese, the restaurant in question, on a Saturday night, praying that there wouldn’t be epic waits for a dinner table.Read More

Hao Noodle and Tea by Madam Zhu’s Kitchen

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The moment I walked into Hao Noodle and Tea by Madam Zhu’s Kitchen, a new Chinese restaurant in the West Village, it was such a shitshow that I thought there was no way the food here was going to be good. I was greeted by a hostess with a blank stare who kept quoting guests wait times that probably weren’t real and showed us to the waiting area, handing me a menu of “mocktails” and teas that I could order from, only two out of the three special teas were not available that night. It didn’t really matter if I wanted anything, because no one was really around to take my order. The whole staff looked like they had been cobbled together at the last minute to run this restaurant, except no one gave them any guidance on how to do it, and no one looked like they really cared.Read More

Málà Project Dry Pot vs. Hou Yi Hot Pot

Everyone knows about hot pot, but what about dry pot? I didn’t even know dry pot was a thing until I heard about Málà Project, a restaurant in the East Village that specializes in it. I was trying to research the origins of dry pot, and I found a few links that referenced the Chongqing area of Sichuan as the birthplace. It uses the same seasonings and ingredients as hot pot, except there is no soup base, hence the name.

complimentary dumplings at mala project. plus the restaurant is byob
complimentary dumplings at mala project. plus the restaurant is byob

The East Village is home to both dry pot and hot pot, and the restaurants are nearly a block away from one another. Málà Project is on 1st Ave and 7th St, and Hou Yi Hot Pot, the extremely popular hot pot restaurant in Chinatown, recently opened a location on 2nd Ave and 6th St. So what do you do when you’re at a hot pot crossroads, do you make a left and go wet, or do you turn the corner to go dry?

It’s not even a question, as I would choose Hou Yi over Málà any day. You simply cannot complete with an all-you-can-eat $30 hot pot buffet with unlimited drinks and ice cream. This is how the dynasty of Todai wields its power in the suburbs of America, and now the children of those value-driven Asian families who’ve moved to cities will gladly keep those traditions going at Hou Yi. I am one of them, and I cannot tell you how excited I was that I got to drink as many lychee and chrysanthemum drinks as I wanted, and we were not shy about asking for multiple orders of beef, to get the most out of our $30 buck.

perhaps our third order of meat
perhaps our third order of meat

Obviously quantity over quality has its drawbacks. The quality of the beef, fish balls, tofu and vegetables are good, but the chicken and fish are not. The sheer number of options at the sauce bar can be overwhelming. Do you use peanut sauce, bbq sauce, sesame paste, soy sauce? Do you mix every single thing together? Are you even supposed to do that? I decided to throw together a base of sesame paste, some soy sauce, a little chili oil, some fish sauce and a few scallions, and that actually worked out pretty well.

boiling hot pot...so good but so smelly
boiling hot pot…so good but so smelly

Another drawback is the smell. Hot pot stinks up your clothes, and in anticipation of that, the staff covers your jackets in plastic. The hot pot cooks directly in front of you, and all the meat-broth steam gets up in your pores like the steam machine at a sauna, so you are literally saturated in hot pot broth. There’s no way around it. Just wash your clothes immediately after. This is one area where Málà has an edge. All the dry pots are cooked in the back, so your clothes are safe.

the spicy bowl at mala
the spicy bowl at mala

One thing that both hot pot and dry pot have in common? Spicy means SPICY. At Málà, we ordered one non-spicy pot and another mild spicy pot, and everyone was struggling with the mild one. Meat sweats, hiccups, multiple glasses of water, you name it. They are not messing around with heat at either place. Hou Yi at least has a remedy for bringing down the heat, an unlimited ice cream bar. The whole experience at Hou Yi is just so sweet, from beginning to end, and there’s no question which kind of pot will reign supreme.


Hou Yi Hot Pot
97 2nd Ave (between 5th and 6th St)
New York, NY 10002
(212) 966-3420

Málà Project
122 1st Ave (between 7th and 8th St)
New York, NY 10009
(212) 353-8880

Dim Sum Go Go

The best thing about having Asian relatives over is that a meal of dim sum will likely take place in the near future. Which is what happened over Thanksgiving weekend, we all went to my favorite dim sum restaurant in the city, Dim Sum Go Go. A lot of purists look down on this place, saying that it’s Americanized, but I don’t care, I love how civil the experience is and I prefer the cleaner flavor profile. There are no pushcarts roaming about, you tick off the items you want to order, and the food arrives as it’s ready. Dim Sum Go Go was especially on point during that visit, all my favorites were fresh and at their best–the shrimp rice roll, the shumai, the shrimp balls, and the seafood fried rice. Maybe it’s not the way your grandma made it, but the ABC way is the way I like it.

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char siu bao
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chicken feet. very polarizing.
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shumai, spare ribs, shrimp and chives dumplings, char siu bao
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chinese pea shoots
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dipping sauces
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seafood fried rice with dried scallop
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fried shrimp balls
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shrimp rice roll
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tripe
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turnip cake

And the best part about dim sum is that you’re never so full that you don’t have room for a little more. Like some ice cream from The Original Chinatown Ice Cream Factory. All the Asian flavors you could ever dream of are served here, and nothing gets more Asian than an ice cream cone with a pink Pocky stick in it. With some sweet scoops of taro and black sesame, now your meal is really complete.

taro and black sesame ice cream
taro and black sesame ice cream


Dim Sum Go Go
5 E Broadway (between Chatham Sq and Catherine St)
New York, NY 10038

(212) 732-0797

The Original Chinatown Ice Cream Factory
65 Bayard St (between Pell and Bayard St)
New York, NY 10013
(212) 608-4170