Sticky Buns (Partybus Bakeshop)

I have a soft spot for sticky buns. Maybe it’s because of those childhood memories of going to the mall and eating the ooey gooey Cinnabon in the cafeteria. There’s nothing better than having one with a cup of coffee in the morning. Several bakeries in the city excel at this pastry, particularly my beloved Balthazar Bakery in Soho, which is now closed indefinitely, but others like Cafe Altro Paradiso, Roberta’s and Mah Ze Dahr (when it is available) make good ones too. Another one to add to the sticky bun list is Partybus Bakeshop, a small bakery in the Lower East Side that I discovered during the early days of NYC quarantine. Their yummy sticky bun reminds me the most of the Cinnabon roll of my youth in that the roll is soft and doughy, but it’s topped with a maple glaze, not frosting. I noticed that Partybus Bakeshop posts several of their baked good recipes on their Instagram. Of course the image of the sticky buns with all the cinnamon swirls caught my eye and I had to make them this week.

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Scones – Inspired by Flour Bakery’s Currant Spelt Oat Scones

I’ve never been to Joanne Chang’s famous Flour Bakery in Boston, but I do have her cookbook, and after having made her banana bread, I’m definitely a big fan. Lately I’ve been on a big baking kick, and I was inspired to pick back up her book and make something new. My friend Timmie told me she made Chang’s currant spelt oat scones, which was published in Pastry Love: A Baker’s Journal of Favorite Recipes. Nobody really gets excited by scones, do they? They look so dry and oversized…especially with oat and spelt in there. But she swore by these, and I can confirm that these are buttery and delightful.

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Gowanus: Freek’s Mill + Ample Hills

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the dining room at freek’s mill

Brooklyn is no big secret these days, but Gowanus is a part of Brooklyn that still feels undiscovered. I ventured out there for the first time last week, and I felt like I was discovering a whole new world where the streets were broad, ice cream parlors came with rooftops and shuffleboard clubs were trending. It’s nowhere near as developed as Bedford Ave and has more in common with low-key locales such as Bushwick and Red Hook–lots of space and warehouses along the water. There is a pretty good restaurant scene in Gowanus, the most well known one is probably The Pines, and now Freek’s Mill, a seasonal, small plates restaurant on Nevins St, is a new addition that continues to bring the average up.

the charred radicchio with burrata, walnuts and currants
the charred radicchio with burrata, walnuts and currants

wood roasted oysters
wood roasted oysters

I’m a little over the whole seasonally driven small plates trend, but after my dinner at Freek’s Mill, I’m having a change of heart. In fact, the small plates concept actually worked in our favor, because that meant we could try more things on the menu, and since everything was so good, we definitely wanted to (and did!) add on to our original order. The charred radicchio, which came with a sweet and creamy burrata, was truly a pleasure. It’s like they broke all the rules regarding leafy vegetable prep, weighing it down with liquids and cheese and testing the limits of its frailty by charring it, yet somehow they came up far, far ahead.

octopus with fingerling potatoes and salsa verde
octopus with fingerling potatoes and salsa verde

dry aged duck with refried cranberry beans and rosemary honey
dry aged duck with refried cranberry beans and rosemary honey

the stracci pasta with lamb, olives and ricotta
the stracci pasta with lamb, olives and ricotta

I also had a lot of love for the grilled octopus. This is a small plate that’s been so overdone, appearing as an appetizer on so many menus, and the prep being nearly the same, but the one at Freek’s Mill, with its tenderness and meatiness, and the airy lemon aioli, manages to keep it fresh. The dry aged duck caught my eye, mostly because I didn’t know one could do this with waterfowl, and let’s just say that this duck aged pretty well. The cranberry beans that came with it was an interesting choice, I’m not sure if it was quite the right accompaniment to the duck, but the way the beans were repurposed as a hash as opposed to something boiled and stewed was something different. We were on such a roll that we ordered the stracci, a creamy ricotta pasta served with lamb, and this last minute gamble was a big win.

ample hills creamery
ample hills creamery

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two giant scoops

Afterwards we walked over to Ample Hills Creamery, which specializes in crazy, fun ice cream flavors like Ooey Gooey Butter Cake, which is amazing, and Snap, Mallow, Pop!. You can eat your cones upstairs on the roof deck, which is the best way to consume ice cream, and something you could never do in space constrained Manhattan. You really can’t ask for more on a perfect summer’s day. Some people summer in the Hamptons, I think I’m going to summer in Gowanus.


Freek’s Mill
285 Nevins St (between Union and Sackett St)
Brooklyn, NY 11217
(718) 852-3000

Ample Hills
305 Nevin St (between Union and President St)
Brooklyn, NY 11215
(347) 725-4061

Nicoletta’s Soft Serve is the Bee’s Knees

fior di latte soft serve - the saving grace of the doomed Nicoletta
fior di latte soft serve – the saving grace of the doomed Nicoletta

See this picture here? It’s a picture of the best soft serve in Manhattan. This soft serve is sweet and creamy but amazingly light. It almost tastes like marshmallows because the texture is so fluffy. Where can you get this divine cup of soft serve? Oddly enough, it’s available for $5 at Nicoletta, the critically panned pizzeria in the East Village. It’s probably the only edible item on the menu. One critic even said “Michael White’s future might be in soft serve instead.” He’s definitely right, because Nicoletta’s future as a pizzeria was practically dead on arrival. Here’s hoping they get their act together and transform this shipwreck into a 24-hour soft serve parlor.


Nicoletta
160 Second Ave.
New York, NY 10003
(212) 432-1600