Jua Restaurant Review in Flatiron

Finally, a Korean restaurant breaks into my top 10 restaurants list. I had a very impressive meal at Jua, the new fine dining Korean restaurant run by Chef Hoyoung Kim, who used to be the executive chef at Jungsik. The nine course Jua tasting menu consisted of Korean dishes that I grew up eating, only fancier and better. The cooking was on par with what we expect from a highly esteemed Western restaurant. It makes me proud of how far Korean food has come in extending its reach far beyond just the humble bbq restaurant (which is still awesome) and joining the ranks of elite institutions, a status that tends to be reserved for the fancy European place or the pricey sushi omakase.

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Pasta at Rezdora in Flatiron

Describing something as “grandmother’s cooking” brings to mind food that is humble and homey, perhaps not the most refined but made with a lot of heart. Rezdora, which is the word for grandmother in Modena, Italy, is the name of the new restaurant in Flatiron that is run by Stefano Secchi, who trained in the kitchen of Massimo Bottura’s Osteria Francescana, the world’s best restaurant in 2018. The grandmother in this kitchen, however, is no creaky old lady rolling meatballs by hand. She’s quite savvy and knows her way not only around the kitchen but also around the woods. As a result, the pasta at Rezdora is one of the best in New York City.

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abcV = very expensive vegetables

sweet greens and the fitness & protein smoothie

All you need to know about abcV, the new vegetable-driven restaurant in Jean-Georges’ abc empire, is that they make their fresh organic juices with a Juicero machine and charge $15 for one. It serves overpriced vegetarian meals packaged as some sort of revolutionary “cultural shift towards plant based intelligence” (this is from their website) but really, like the Juicero machine, you’re paying mostly for the pretty packaging.

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Cote, a Korean Steakhouse in Flatiron

cote nyc, the new korean kid in town

Depending on how you see it, the name of the restaurant Cote can either reference the Korean word for flower or a particular cut of meat. If Cote had its way, it’d want you to reference both. It occupies a unique niche as a hybrid steakhouse and Korean bbq restaurant, never fully claiming one or the other, defined by fluidity rather than labels.

the name cote in millennial korean pink

american psycho or the dry-aging room?

From the moment you walk in, Cote keeps you guessing. The entrance leads to a dark blue hallway with a neon sign of the restaurant’s name in Korean lit in Millennial pink, giving off a vibe that’s more sexy Meatpacking lounge than staid Midtown East. If you walk downstairs you can see Cote’s dry-aging room, where different pieces of meat hang stylistically in lighting that brings to mind the surreal and violent thriller Neon Demon. Once you get seated in one of the booths in the back, you will see familiar signs of a table-top grill, but even so, these grills are gold and silent, sucking the smoke and smells out of sight, out of mind.Read More

Nur NYC in Flatiron

walk into the nur

The world of Middle Eastern food in New York City continues to evolve beyond the typical falafel or kebab joint. The latest addition is Nur, an upscale Middle Eastern restaurant in Flatiron that’s helmed by famous Israeli chef Meir Adoni. From the moment you walk into Nur, you can sense a palpable energy about the place. Maybe it’s the music, maybe it’s the excitement from the other diners rubbing off onto you, but you can’t help but think that you’re into something good.Read More