abcV = very expensive vegetables

sweet greens and the fitness & protein smoothie

All you need to know about abcV, the new vegetable-driven restaurant in Jean-Georges’ abc empire, is that they make their fresh organic juices with a Juicero machine and charge $15 for one. It serves overpriced vegetarian meals packaged as some sort of revolutionary “cultural shift towards plant based intelligence” (this is from their website) but really, like the Juicero machine, you’re paying mostly for the pretty packaging.

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Cote, a Korean Steakhouse in Flatiron

cote nyc, the new korean kid in town

Depending on how you see it, the name of the restaurant Cote can either reference the Korean word for flower or a particular cut of meat. If Cote had its way, it’d want you to reference both. It occupies a unique niche as a hybrid steakhouse and Korean bbq restaurant, never fully claiming one or the other, defined by fluidity rather than labels.

the name cote in millennial korean pink
american psycho or the dry-aging room?

From the moment you walk in, Cote keeps you guessing. The entrance leads to a dark blue hallway with a neon sign of the restaurant’s name in Korean lit in Millennial pink, giving off a vibe that’s more sexy Meatpacking lounge than staid Midtown East. If you walk downstairs you can see Cote’s dry-aging room, where different pieces of meat hang stylistically in lighting that brings to mind the surreal and violent thriller Neon Demon. Once you get seated in one of the booths in the back, you will see familiar signs of a table-top grill, but even so, these grills are gold and silent, sucking the smoke and smells out of sight, out of mind.Read More

Nur NYC in Flatiron

walk into the nur

The world of Middle Eastern food in New York City continues to evolve beyond the typical falafel or kebab joint. The latest addition is Nur, an upscale Middle Eastern restaurant in Flatiron that’s helmed by famous Israeli chef Meir Adoni. From the moment you walk into Nur, you can sense a palpable energy about the place. Maybe it’s the music, maybe it’s the excitement from the other diners rubbing off onto you, but you can’t help but think that you’re into something good.Read More

The Clocktower

the scallop crudo with black olive and lemon jalapeno ice
the scallop crudo with black olive and lemon jalapeno ice

There’s a certain standard for a restaurant in the Flatiron District. This is a neighborhood that’s a little more grown up, home to affluent yuppies who like their take out from Eataly and their classes at Flywheel, and it’s just a few stops away from the business hustle and bustle of Midtown East. So it’s perfect for when you want to feel a little more dressed up, to squeeze in a power lunch, or to show your parents a good time.┬áThe downside to this is that things are a little too buttoned up for you to totally let loose and have a fun time, although with enough drinks that can change.Read More

Korean Banchan at Atoboy

atoboy place settings

At the core of a Korean meal is rice and banchan side dishes. The quality and variety of banchan can really make or break your experience. I know it’s going to be a good day when a restaurant throws in a steamed egg or pan-fried tofu, and on the flipside, it’s always a sad day when all I get is kimchee and some limp┬ábean sprouts. Atoboy, a new restaurant in Flatiron run by Junghyun Park, the former Chef de Cuisine of Jungsik, rethinks the banchan side dish as the main dish, where you can make a meal out of several of them. The menu is divided into three sections of small plates, which is differentiated by portion size, and for $36 you can pick a dish from each one of the sections along with a bowl of rice, the traditional white rice or the rice special of the day for an extra $2. As an fyi, you really should pay up for the rice special, otherwise you will miss out on something amazing like the bacon and scallion rice.Read More