Bar Moga, Japanese Speakeasy in Greenwich Village

If you like your bar food as interesting as your cocktails, then you might want to pull up a chair at Bar Moga, a retro, Japanese-inspired bar run by alums of Milk & Honey in Greenwich Village. You won’t find the typical plate of french fries or chicken wings on the menu. The space is far too elegant to allow for greasy pub grub like that. The word “moga”, after all, is a term used to refer to Japanese women in the 1920s who followed Western fashions and lifestyles, and she probably would want bites more consistent with her tastes, like kani crab croquettes or caesar salad.Read More

Loring Place in Greenwich Village

loring place, an abc kitchen for the downtown crowd

Seasonally-driven restaurants abound in New York City, but if there’s one specifically made for those lucky 1% who own beautiful townhouses in the West Village, then it would be Loring Place. Dan Kluger is the chef here, and you may of heard of him due to his prior stint at ABC Kitchen, another popular farm-to-table restaurant frequented by the well-heeled. You can expect the same sort of pretty, air-brushed aesthetic at Loring Place, although thankfully there’s less of the fussiness of ABC Home’s signature ornate chandeliers and woodwork. The restaurant is named after a street in the Bronx where Kluger’s father once lived, so it’s a little more down-to-earth. But you will still see plenty of those picture perfect ladies who lunch drinking mimosas and rose all around you.Read More

French Women Don’t get Fat at MIMI

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It’s widely known that French women don’t get fat, even though they eat lots of carbs and butter. I know this because there was a very popular book by the same name that said so, and the general perception seems to be that Parisiens are so much better at life than we Americans are. French women live to eat and enjoy the meal in front of them, unlike the American women who eat salads at their desks and get sad about eating a cookie.Read More

Sushi Zo Omakase

inside sushi zo
inside sushi zo

Does the high-end sushi omakase market in NY seem a bit crowded to you? Shuko, Yasuda, Nakazawa, Neta, O Ya…and now there’s a new one to add to the list. Sushi Zo, a highly acclaimed LA based restaurant that tops all the best of lists in that city, seems confident that it has something new to offer with its $200 a head omakase. Chef Masa made the move on behalf of the LA team to run the east coast franchise, which is curiously located on the scrappy streets of Greenwich Village. The space has the standard minimalist look and feel of a serious sushi restaurant run by a control freak chef, but Masa-san is not one of those martinets who demand that you eat something in a particular way. He seems a lot more Americanized than most sushi chefs and hence engages comfortably with his customers like a peer, which makes for a relaxed atmosphere. No tense exchanges for mistakenly dipping your fish in soy sauce or not using your fingers.

tuna from north carolina, yellow jack mackerel, horse mackerel and red snapper with yuzu pepper
tuna from north carolina, yellow jack mackerel, horse mackerel and red snapper with yuzu pepper
halibut from long island
halibut from long island
spanish mackerel from long island with ponzu sauce
spanish mackerel from long island with ponzu sauce
amberjack from japan
amberjack from japan
flame grilled sea perch from japan
flame grilled sea perch from japan
sea bream with roasted shishito pepper
sea bream with roasted shishito pepper
medium fatty blue fin tuna from north carolina
medium fatty blue fin tuna from north carolina
scallop from hokkaido
scallop from hokkaido
monk fish liver from maine with ponzu sauce
monk fish liver from maine with ponzu sauce
chawanmushi
chawanmushi
black sea bass from long island
black sea bass from long island
uni from hokkaido
uni from hokkaido
salmon roe from alaska
salmon roe from alaska
white clam from washington state
white clam from washington state
live shrimp from japan
live shrimp from japan
anago sea eel from japan
anago sea eel from japan
sea urchin from maine hand roll
sea urchin from maine hand roll
tamago
tamago
clear soup
clear soup

In my opinion, what makes Sushi Zo different from other places is its technique of pre-seasoning its sushi with sauces beyond the typical soy, as well as a local approach to sourcing its fish. A lot of the fish was from Long Island or North Carolina, which I found to be very interesting, as other restaurants seem to fly in everything from Japan. And the quality of these domestic fish was very good and made me rethink the whole Japan is better mentality when it comes to raw fish.

I’m usually on the fence when it comes to pre-marinated sushi, especially when they get a little non traditional with the ponzu and the yuzu, because shouldn’t the fish be good on its own? But the sea bream with roasted shishito peppers convinced me otherwise. It’s definitely ok to dress up your fish a little bit. And I’m always a stickler for a great anago, a creamier and flakier eel than its fishier, freshwater counterpart unagi. I first had anago at Nakamura in Tokyo, and the one at Sushi Zo was just as dreamy.

By the end of the meal, I was completely stuffed and felt like I was suffering from gout. There were a lot of pieces in the omakase, but at the same time, it cost $200 a person, so you should be getting the whole sea at that price point. It’s hard being the new kid in town, especially one that’s full of more established sushi restaurants. I’m not quite sure if Sushi Zo’s style is distinctive enough or significantly better than the competition’s to consistently draw business its way, but Masa-san and his staff definitely deserve a closer look.


Sushi Zo
88 W. 3rd St (between Sullivan and Thompson St)
New York, NY 10012
(646) 405-4826

Vegan Food, by CHLOE

When I took Ruoxi to the new vegan restaurant by CHLOE in Greenwich Village, the first thing he said was, “Wow, there are a lot of girls here.” It’s true that the ratio of women to men was largely skewed towards female, and you could probably count the number of men on two hands. He looked concern, taking the lack of dudes to be a sign that this food would be too healthy and spa-like to appeal to people like him.

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the classic burger with a tempeh-lentil-chia-walnut patty, pickles, onion, beet ketchup, special sauce and potato bun
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air baked sweet potato french fries

Which is why it was impressive that he was so sold on the Classic Burger, which he proclaimed to be the best veggie burger he had ever tried. Granted, he probably has only ever tried two veggie burgers in his life, but Ruoxi never judges on a curve, which means the Classic Burger was objectively a great burger. This patty, a blend of tempeh, lentil, chia and walnut, will never truly mimic a juicy, savory meat patty, but the light, nutty veggie “hash brown”, if you will, had its own merits. The tangy pickles and the ketchup like special sauce also helped to make the experience of eating the veggie burger taste very, very similar to the real thing. The air baked sweet potato fries, on the other hand, were just as tasty and crispy as the fried version.

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spicy thai salad with apricot-sriracha glazed tempeh, quinoa, edamame, scallion, crispy wontons and peanut dressing

The salads here are not the leafy kinds that you would normally expect. They’re big, hearty bowls that are densely full of good stuff. The spicy thai salad, for instance, looked like a bowl of Chinese takeout on a bed of quinoa and edamame, and the taste wasn’t that far off either. The apricot-sriracha glaze on the chicken-like tempeh had caramelized into a crispy shell that was very reminiscent of General Tso’s. It was extremely satisfying, much like a meal from P. F. Chang’s, but 10x healthier.

This vegan restaurant was so good, that Ruoxi said he would willingly come back for some more, even if it meant sitting awkwardly between lots of girls and their yoga mats. Chloe or whoever is running the restaurant knows what she’s doing. She’s focused on making good, wholesome food that actually tastes good. Yes, the initial draw might be the health conscious chicks, but with food this good, first come the girls, and then come the guys…


by CHLOE
185 Bleecker Street (between Macdougal and Sullivan St)
New York, NY 10012
(212) 290-8000