Nordic Eats at Almanak in Grand Central’s Great Northern Food Hall

great northern food hall at grand central

“Why don’t we meet up at Grand Central for a bite to eat?” said no one ever. Unless you and your friend are both catching the same train and want to enter the circus that is the Lower Level Dining Concourse. Or if you work in Midtown East and your colleagues want to grab drinks at the Grand Central Oyster Bar. Or maybe you don’t like your friend and you’re subtly trying to convey this by suggesting an undesirable location. But the dining options have come a long way at Grand Central, thanks to Claus Meyer, a culinary entrepreneur who recently opened the Great Northern Food Hall to bring high quality Nordic cuisine to the station. Now you can get artisanal rye breads and nutritious Danish porridge on your daily commute.Read More

Copenhagen Travels: Hearty Dinner at Radio

Out of all the New Nordic restaurants we’ve been to in Copenhagen, Radio stands out for being the most accessible, and the heartiest. This was probably the first time that I actually felt pretty full after a meal. I think it’s because the proteins and produce they featured were less dainty than the ones we’ve had at other places. It was truly more of a meat-and-potatoes place, much like the restaurants in America!

The prices are also a lot more budget friendly than a Relae or a Geranium. A five course dinner costs 400 Dkk ($80), while the 3 course option costs 300 Dkk ($60). It was a pleasant surprise to see prices set below $100, especially for a restaurant with a Noma alumni pedigree, which can demand a huge premium.

The setting is very casual, including the service, which was a little inconsistent and slow at times. It took a long time for someone to bring us water or take our order, probably about 15 minutes or so, which was annoying. However, once the drinks and bread basket came out, the pacing of the meal resumed some normalcy.

Each table received a small plate of radishes dressed in some cream and seasoned with hip rose and sugar. It was a light and fitting way to start a summer meal.

radish with hip rose, sugar and cream
radish with hip rose, sugar and cream

And of course, the requisite sourdough bread basket. The bread was a little less sticky and glutinous than the one at Relae. The onion butter was fantastic–the Danes know how to season their butter!

sourdough bread and onion butter
sourdough bread and onion butter

The first course was the scallop with cucumber and seaweed. It was definitely a crowd pleaser–the scallops had been roasted to perfection, and the char melded well with the surrounding cream sauce. The slight hints of pickles and briney seaweed kept things interesting, and the sliced cucumbers had a nice meatiness to them.

scallop, cucumber, seaweed
scallop, cucumber, seaweed

The second course was raw mackerel in buttermilk whey with olives, parsley and burnt lettuce. Let me tell you another thing Danes do well–they really know how to grill their leafy vegetables. I loved the smokiness of the lettuce, which complemented the strong flavors of the mackerel, as did the buttermilk whey. The buttermilk was full and muted enough to absorb and soften the impact of the olives and the parsley. It was a dish with a lot of strong flavors that were curiously in balance.

mackerel, lettuce, parsley
mackerel, lettuce, parsley

The third course was dehydrated potatoes and beans. I’m a little ashamed to admit that this was my favorite one. It was just so hearty and satisfying. The potatoes had these amazing golden, blistered outer edges, and it paired perfectly with the smoked cheese. The chubby beans just enhanced the robust heartiness of it all. A master class in rustic comfort food.

potato, smoked cheese, beans
potato, smoked cheese, beans

The fourth course was chicken with cabbage and garlic. The chicken had been seasoned with juniper, which provided it with a very peppery flavor, and an almost bbq-like spice rub. The cabbage leaves were delicious and gave the dish some good texture. I’m not quite sure if I liked the juniper seasoning, but I loved the quality of the chicken itself, and how much meat there was on my plate!

chicken, cabbage, garlic
chicken, cabbage, garlic

The last course was dessert–strawberry, spruce and verbena. I was relieved to find that this didn’t taste like evergreen trees and flowers. Instead, it tasted very much like a refreshing strawberry sorbet with shortbread cookies on top. A great way of incorporating seasonal fruits into a dessert.

strawberry, spruce, verbena
strawberry, spruce, verbena

I left the restaurant very satiated. The meal I had at Radio was probably the most similar to something I’d have in New York or San Francisco–locally sourced, generously portioned, rooted in more traditional cooking methods. It was definitely less refined and inventive than Geranium or Relae, but I liked that it was homey and familiar. I’d definitely recommend Radio for those who want a more accessible introduction to New Nordic cuisine, while staying true to the farm-to-table traditions.


Radio
Julius Thomsens Gade 12
1632 København, Denmark
+45 25 10 27 33

Copenhagen Travels: Eating with Bocuse d’Or Trophies at Geranium

During one of my dessert courses at Geranium, we were invited to dine in the kitchen, where we sat at a small two-top table that displayed three impressive Bocuse d’Or trophies. I suppose that’s the equivalent of having a famous actor invite you over to his house and admire his three Oscars. It was a slightly strange gesture, and a little self-promotional on Chef Rasmus Kofoed’s part, but I can definitely see why he won all of them.

geranium - entrance

My lunch at Geranium was one of the most impressive meals that I’ve had, ever. Far surpassing Per Se in every manner, and even my beloved Blue Hill Stone Barns in some aspects. Each course was so inventive and beautifully presented, twisting and unfolding like a gorgeous pop-up picture book. It’s an absolute must if you are considering a special occasion meal in Copenhagen.

The restaurant is on the 8th floor of a rather unattractive and corporate-looking building complex, but things are much better inside. As we stepped out from the elevator, a very Nordic looking man with white blonde hair greeted us and showed us to our table. It’s a very intimate dining parlor, furnished in a modern and austere color palate of black and gray. The aerial view of the city that the windows provide adds a nice atmospheric touch to the experience.

We went during lunch, and you have the option of choosing a full length lunch course that lasts 3 hours for 1,250 Dkk (roughly $250), or the abbreviated lighter lunch tasting menu that lasts 2 hours for 950 Dkk ($190). Neither option is all that cheap, but I will say that I ordered the shortened version, and I didn’t feel like it was that different from the full length version. Whatever you choose, there are many, many courses that come out for several hours.

As soon as you sit down, even before the actual tasting begins, a series of dainty, elaborate snacks arrive at the table. The common theme here is an emphasis on local ingredients, particularly vegetables and wild herbs, all incorporated in a highly stylized manner. Here is a brief description of all the snacks that were served, accompanied by photos taken by the very talented Ruoxi Chen!

crispy grains from kornly
crispy grains from kornly

Crispy grains from kornly. This was a cheese cracker that had been shaped into a piece of grain and served in a field of grass. It tasted like a very wispy bread stick.

candied carrot balls
candied carrot balls
fermented carrot juice in milky cheese
fermented carrot juice in milky cheese

Milk, fermented juice from carrot and sea buckthorn. The focal point of this snack was carrot, served two different ways. One as a delightful ball of hard candy with a sweet preserve inside, the other as a fermented juice infusing a very mild milky cheese with what tasted like liquid rye.

pickled pear, lemon verbena and pine shoots
pickled pear, lemon verbena and pine shoots

Pickled pear, lemon verbena and pine shoots. This snack was very crisp and clean in taste. The pear had been sliced very thin and pickled to saturation with bright lemon flavors.

jerusalem artichoke, rye and walnut
jerusalem artichoke, rye and walnut

Jerusalem artichoke, rye and walnut. The presentation of the artichoke was like something out of an autumn fairy tale. A small, whimsical tree held the crisp Jerusalem artichoke sticks in its winding branches, while a walnut filled with mayonnaise awaited beneath.

dried flowers and dried apples
dried flowers and dried apples

Dried flowers and dried apples. Two translucent and edible sachets filled with dried apple and flowers arrived on a silver platter. It tasted like those Kasugai gummy muscat candies, only more floral.

charred potato and lightly smoked sheep milk butter
charred potato and lightly smoked sheep milk butter

Charred potato and lightly smoked sheep milk butter. The kitchen played up the charred aspect of the dish, in which the potatoes appeared to be downright burnt, like lumps of coal. Despite the intimidating appearance, the potato itself was warm and fluffy inside, and the skin was wonderfully smoked and blistery. When placed in the spoonful of rich milk butter, it tasted like the world’s smallest but tastiest baked potato.

cep soup and egg yolk in vinegar
cep soup and egg yolk in vinegar

Cep soup and egg yolk in vinegar. The warm and frothy mushroom soup was full of earthy, savory flavors, while the vinegar balanced out the broth with some acidity. It was an interesting sensation swallowing the soup in one shot, with the initial lightness from the foam giving way to the extremely deep and dense sensations of the raw quail egg.

celeriac with seaweed powder, skyr and fish roe
celeriac with seaweed powder, skyr and fish roe

Celeriac with seaweed powder, skyr and fish roe. Again, the presentation was like something out of a fairy tale, although one with a darker tone, like an evil tree branch from Maleficent. The delicate celeriac root paired well with the yogurt sauce, which was saturated with fantastically briney flavors from the fish roe.

The proper courses hadn’t even arrived, and already we had tried eight different things. The plates that followed were slightly larger than the snacks, and incorporated more proteins.

tomato water, herbs and jellied ham
tomato water, herbs and jellied ham

Tomato water, herbs and jellied ham. The tomato water tasted like a very nice consommé. It was light with a nice acidity to it, while the jellied ham provided the water with some salt and savory weight.

dillstone, mackerel, horseradish and granita from pickled cucumber
dillstone, mackerel, horseradish and granita from pickled cucumber

“Dillstone”, mackerel, horseradish and granita from pickled cucumber. This was another course that wins high marks for presentation. A small bowl of dark and green pebbles arrived, and I was expecting the edible green ones to taste like hard candy. They were actually soft when bitten into, like a jelly bean filled with dill-flavored mackerel. You were to dip the stones in a separate bowl with horseradish cream and icy granita. There were so many creative ways of incorporating different spicy and pickled layers in this dish.

bread with emmer and spelt
bread with emmer and spelt

Bread with emmer and spelt. The arrival of the bread basket marked a brief interlude in the tasting. The tiny bread rolls looked like golden, grainy financiers, and they had a bit of a cheese flavor to them like in a popover. The onion flavored butter that came on the side was delicious.

onions and chamomile flower vinegar
onions and chamomile flower vinegar

Onions and chamomile flower vinegar. I am not a big fan of onions, but I have to give the kitchen a lot of credit for making this strong vegetable very palatable. The preparation de-emphasized the offensive and sharp flavors of raw onion. The white ones were grilled and very meaty, while the red ones were tasty and pickled.

grilled langoustine in juniper aroma with red elements
grilled langoustine in juniper aroma with red elements

Grilled langoustine in juniper aroma with red elements. The servers arrived with the raw langoustine in a field of Christmas tree branches. They then proceeded to quickly flame torch it before our eyes, and placed the langoustine on top of a pool of red beets and cherry sauce. The langoustine was so remarkably fresh. It was silky and raw on the inside, while the quick flames provided the meat with a slightly smoky and firm skin. I would say this and the dillstones were my two favorites.

lamb, herbs and pickled strawberries
lamb, herbs and pickled strawberries

Lamb, herbs and pickled strawberries. A small little bush of herbs arrived, hiding the lamb and strawberries underneath. The braised lamb had the crumbly texture of hamburger meat, which I thought was ideal for picking up all the flavors of the tart strawberries and herbs surrounding it. The meat itself wasn’t gamey at all, even without the assistance of a strong herb, which I found impressive.

This marked the completion of the savory courses, and the start of the desserts.

forest floor in july, wood sorrel, beech leaves and woodruff
forest floor in july, wood sorrel, beech leaves and woodruff

“Forest floor in July,” wood sorrel, beech leaves and woodruff. This strange and convoluted name does not do justice to this amazing dessert. It sounds like you’ll be eating a bowl full of pine needles, but really you were served an excellent bowl of white chocolate. It was incredibly creamy and very subtle, like a delicate vanilla panna cotta, only the powdered wild herbs made it a little more complex and interesting. The granita was again used to good effect here, providing the dessert with an additional layer of texture and flavor.

yoghurt with red branches and dried red sorrel
yoghurt with red branches and dried red sorrel

Yoghurt with red branches and dried sorrel. This was the dessert course that we had consumed in the kitchen with the trophies. It tasted like a mild custard, and the candied beets and sorrel were crunchy and sweet.

green egg with pine
green egg with pine

And of course, to finish, we were served the last dessert, green egg with pine. It was a short and sweet way to end the meal. The small chocolate egg was cold, helping to cleanse the palate of the medley of flavors and experiences it had gone through. But it was impossible to wipe the memory of the palate completely clean–the scenes from this very memorable meal will continue to play out in my head, blooming continuously like the perennial geranium itself.


Geranium
Per Henrik Lings Allé 4, 8
DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø
+45 69 96 00 20

Copenhagen Travels: New Nordic Cuisine at Relæ

My meal at Relæ, a restaurant in Copenhagen run by two former Noma alums, Christian Puglisi and Kim Rossen, was very challenging. It was one of those meals where everything tasted unfamiliar and had no frame of reference to any sort of food I’ve had in the past. It’s very similar to the experience of watching a very strange art house film, and at the end of the movie you’re wondering what on earth that was all about (did anyone feel this way about Melancholia or that Macbeth movie from the 1970s?).

There was no easing into the strangeness. A small plate of what looked like a bright green tongue covered in a strip of raw cucumber arrived. This strange morsel was actually “hip rose,” or the fruit of a rose plant, which apparently is edible. It was an extremely fleshy fruit with a squelchy sensation when you bit into it, like a very fat and large lychee without any of the sweetness. It was tangy and refreshing in the way that pickles are in the summer. The novelty of ingredients and sensations that was revealed in this amuse-bouche was a telling harbinger of what was to come.

pickled hip rose and raw cucumber
pickled hip rose and raw cucumber

Even the bread was a little different. Two slices of sourdough bread arrived alongside our sparkling wine aperitifs. There was a nice rustic crunch to the crust, while the inner bread was especially glutinous and almost sticky in nature, similar to the consistency of Korean dduk rice cakes. The whole time I kept thinking perhaps they mixed rice flour in there? It tasted great, especially with the excellent olive oil.

sourdough bread and sicilian olive oil
sourdough bread and sicilian olive oil

There are two 4-course tasting options–the omnivore and the herbivore. It’s pretty obvious that one includes meat and the other doesn’t. I felt like the herbivore option would be a better representation of New Nordic foraging cuisine, so I went with it, even though some of the dishes seemed a little out there…

…like this first one. Unripe strawberries covered in a thick green nasturtium sauce. This dish definitely raises a lot of questions. The first one might be, what do unripe strawberries taste like? Imagine wringing out all of the sweetness of the berry so that you are left with only a tart and blanched out fruit. It is a very strange sensation biting into a strawberry that isn’t juicy or sweet at all. And what on earth is nasturtium? It is a regional flower, which grows right across the street from the restaurant, if I wanted to check it out, and its flavor reminded me very strongly of dirt. I felt like I was digging up young, unripe strawberries from the soil. Needless to say, this course was a very difficult one to finish.

unripe strawberries and nasturtium
unripe strawberries and nasturtium

The first course in the omnivore option was a venison tartare with peas and mint. This was a much more palatable dish. Venison can be a very gamey meat, but it had a very mild flavor here, and it was impressively flavorful with just a few touches of salt and oil. The peas almost seemed like they had just been picked from the pod, and hence their texture was extra crunchy and the taste a little bitter. It was a nice contrast in savory flavors and different textures.

The second course, which was the same for both the herbivore and omnivore option, was a plate of sunflower seeds served in melted kornly, a smooth goat cheese made in Denmark, and lightly seasoned with some pine needles. The seeds had been pressure cooked, which rendered them soft while allowing them to swell up from absorbing the surrounding moisture. I felt like I was eating sunflower grits or sunflower mac and cheese. The kornly itself tasted like a sharp cheddar, similar to the cheese they use on Cheez-It crackers, which is a strange comparison, but it’s the most illustrative one I can come up with. It was definitely a lot more accessible than the unripe strawberries, that’s for sure, extremely comforting and filing, but very rich.

Relae - sunflower seeds and kornly
sunflower seeds, kornly and pine

The third herbivore dish arrived, a literal bouquet of green leafy vegetables dressed in a grilled goatcream. Grilling cream is definitely a cooking technique I’ve never come across in any restaurant in the States. As a result, the dressing assumes a lot of smoked flavors, making it appear as if the vegetables had been grilled, yet they clearly hadn’t. I felt like I was eating a really fresh and delicious Caesar salad right off the grill. And it really is meant to be eaten as a bouquet, because so much more flavor is extracted when eating the vegetables together rather than in separate parts. Otherwise you will miss sharp floral notes or a piquant pine needle.

vegetable bouquet and grilled goatcream
vegetable bouquet and grilled goatcream

On the omnivore side, the third course was a pork served with pickled rhubarb. The pork meat was especially marbled and full of tendons. It was prepared well, and again it only needed minimal seasoning since the meat itself was flavorful on its own. Rhubarb usually has a mild flavor, so it was interesting that it assumed the sharp flavors and textures of a cooked, caramelized onion in this dish. The components were placed on top of a dark, au jus like sauce, which I think may have been pig’s blood, but it didn’t have that off putting, iron-y characteristic at all.

pork from hindsholm, pickled rhubarb
pork from hindsholm, pickled rhubarb

The final course was dessert, a vanilla ice cream with dried raspberry and caramelized mustard. This being Relæ, you knew that this wouldn’t be such a simple and straightforward dessert. The ice cream itself was nice and creamy, but the dried raspberries were again devoid of any sweetness and were instead very bitter. I supposed the staff did not want us to leave things on a sweet note, the aim is to challenge and befuddle, and I certainly was very puzzled by how this ice cream wasn’t sweet.

vanilla ice, dried raspberry and caramelized mustard
vanilla ice, dried raspberry and caramelized mustard

My first foray into New Nordic cuisine was an eye opening one. I’ve never consumed so many flowers and wild herbs in one sitting, many of which I had to look up on Google to find out what they were. I can’t say that I loved the flavors of each course at Relæ, because several of them were very challenging, but I do remember each one distinctly. Food that is mediocre or safe recedes in the background, but Relæ’s definitely makes you take notice, forcing you to consider ingredients as edible that you typically wouldn’t, and there’s great value in that.


Relæ
Jægersborggade 41
2200 København N
(+45) 3696 6609