Sola Pasta Bar in Soho

sola pasta bar in soho

Do you remember eating from the pasta bar in the dorm cafeteria during your college years? Remember how you’d scoop out either plain spaghetti or penne noodles and then choose between a tomato or an alfredo sauce? So that’s what the pasta dishes at Sola Pasta Bar in Soho remind me of, which is pretty disappointing considering that a former Michelin-star chef from Italy is behind the operations.Read More

Fast Casual Pasta at The Sosta in Nolita

pasta with a side of millennial pink at the sosta

Are you a Millennial who’s into wellness brands and likes her pasta served in a shade of fluorescent pink? Then The Sosta, the new fast-casual pasta restaurant from the minds behind By Chloe, is the perfect place for you. On the corner of Mott and Kenmare St, the bright lights of the restaurant invite you in to consider their Italian offerings. The dishes have catchy names, mixing familiar faces like bolognese and vodka sauce with interesting pasta options like gemelli and zucca. And the pasta tastes healthier than what you would get at the nearby red sauce joints in Little Italy, and an added plus is that you can get the pasta gluten-free or even zucchini noodle-based.Read More

Handmade Pasta at Faro in Bushwick

a grown up restaurant in bushwick

Add Faro to the long, growing list of Brooklyn restaurants that specialize in seasonal, farm-to-table ingredients. But aside from the familiar converted warehouse aesthetic and a hip clientele, Faro stands out from the rest with its focus on handmade pasta, and more importantly, its newly earned Michelin star. Neighborhood restaurants in Brooklyn are a dime a dozen, but Michelin-vetted ones are harder to come by. And an affordable one at that, in which most of the items on the menu are priced at $20 or below.Read More

Lilia

lilia on the corner of n. 10th st and union ave
lilia on the corner of n. 10th st and union ave

Lilia, Missy Robbins’ new Italian restaurant in Williamsburg, is like the most popular girl in school. She has all the right friends–the New York Times gave her three stars while Eater awarded her two–and she is of course very pretty. The former auto body-shop on Union Ave was converted to a lovely, spacious loft style restaurant with great lighting and a sleek bar that is all very nice to look at. And not only is she pretty, she’s super nice! The staff receives you warmly as if you truly had a seat at the table, not as if you were lucky to get in at all, which is so not Brooklyn. She is, on paper, pretty perfect.

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the attractive bar and interior
sheeps milk filled agnolotti
sheeps milk cheese filled agnolotti with saffron, dried tomato and honey

I knew I should like Lilia, but I couldn’t help thinking that everyone seemed to be looking at her through rose colored glasses. Oh the pasta, everyone raved, you can’t go wrong whether you order rigatoni or the papardelle. So on that recommendation, I ordered the sheeps milk cheese filled agnolotti and the malfadini, and I was ready to be blown away. The agnolotti did take my breath away, mostly by how much saffron was in there. It was like someone threw in a whole jar of saffron onto the plate. The flavor of the saffron was so pronounced and distracting that I couldn’t even really tell what else was in the pasta. I can only say it was interesting, and that’s a word you use when you have nothing nicer to say.

malfadini pasta with pink peppercorns and parmigiana reggiano
malfadini pasta with pink peppercorns and parmigiana reggiano

I was relieved to find that the malfadini was actually good, not interesting good. The al dente noodles were generously coated in what seemed like butter and cheese, and the staccato of pink peppercorns was a nice accent to this simple dish. Cacio e pepe, mac and cheese, the malfadini continued the winning tradition of combining carbs and melted cheese in a comforting, satisfying fashion. And it was so fun to eat. Squiggly like ramen noodles and crinkle cut fries. Playing with food was never so fun.

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the cacio e pepe fritelle
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cured sardines with capers, dill and fettunta
the bagna cauda with warm anchovy and garlic sauce
the bagna cauda with warm anchovy and garlic sauce

The appetizers we ordered weren’t bad, but I felt like with each one I was waiting for something more. Like a missing punchline to a joke or an invitation to a party that never came. The cacio e pepe fritelle, a fried cheese ball that resembled a popover and a gougere, wasn’t exponentially better than an hors d’oeuvres at a really nice cocktail party. Even more disappointing was the very fancy sounding bagna cuda, which turned out to be mostly uncooked vegetables served with a warm balsamic dressing-like dipping sauce. I was hoping for some grilled robust veggies, but instead I was like a rabbit gnawing through raw turnips and parsnips. To be fair, there were a few pieces like the roasted caramelized carrot that were pretty stunning, but moments like that were rare. The cured sardines, on the other hand, I couldn’t really complain about. I do like fishy fish, so be warned that these sardines are pretty strong, despite the dose of citrus.

the olive oil cake
the olive oil cake

The olive oil cake with blood orange was a pleasant enough end to the meal, but I’ve had better olive oil cakes elsewhere. I wondered if I was being a hater, one who was jealous of Lilia and was finding any reason to pick her apart. But the couple from Toronto next to me didn’t seem to be all that impressed either, and everyone knows Canadians are so nice. Maybe it’s time for Lilia to take a break from the fanboys and spend time with people who can keep it real with her with some constructive criticism.


Lilia
567 Union Ave (corner of North 10th and Union Ave)
Brooklyn, NY 11211
718-576-3095

Momofuku Nishi

entrance to momofuku nishi
entrance to momofuku nishi

You can’t tell by the name, and not really by the food either, but Momofuku Nishi is an Italian restaurant. This being a David Chang restaurant, it’s intentionally not really as straightforward as that. In a Grub Street article, Chang was quoted as saying, “Trying not to use Italian ingredients to make Italian food is sort of the golden rule.” So instead of pecorino cheese to make cacio e pepe, he utilizes a fermented chickpea miso, and instead of red sauce on the menu there’s a lot of XO sauce. Asian but not Asian. Italian.

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the characteristic momofuku wooden counters and backless chairs
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a can of bantam cider. surprisingly good.
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the chitarra noodles, the star of nishi

Maybe it’s what we ordered, but I felt like the food at Nishi wasn’t Italian at all. It was all very Asian, and derivatives of very familiar Asian noodle dishes. The chitarra was definitely modeled after champong, a spicy Korean seafood noodle soup, as well as nakji bokkeum, a stir-fried octopus dish also from Korea. It was absolutely delicious and my favorite thing that I tried, and frankly I’m glad that it was pretty traditional tasting and not very Italian.

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clams grand lisboa

The curiously named clams grand lisboa was also very similar to the pippies dish that I had at Marigold in Sydney. Chang said that it was inspired by one of his favorite hangouts in Sydney, so maybe he was referring to the same place! The Momofuku version tones down the robust sweet and savory sauce that dresses the little clams and uses an al dente chow mein instead of crunchy noodles. Unfortunately, these two elements are essential to the dish, especially when they both converge so that the noodles soften underneath the influence of the sauce, and so this reinterpretation felt a little incomplete and not quite satisfying.  Even if I didn’t have the original pippies dish as a frame of reference, I don’t think my opinion would have been different. It just didn’t stand out in any way, other than being the most expensive noodle dish on the menu.

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ceci e pepe

The only Italian sounding pasta dish that was consistent with Chang’s new Italian vision was the ceci e pepe. It had the look and feel of the original, but with the chickpea miso, it had a slightly sweetish tinge about it. The noodles also felt fatter, the width being akin to the lo mein noodles from a takeout box. It was a very strange and interesting experience feeling that sensation of Panda Express and traditional trattoria all at the same time. It created new associations with this type of pasta in a good way, and I thought this was another standout from the menu.

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bitter greens and vegetarian xo

I had zero expectations for the bitter greens side dish. I thought it might be similar to a traditional stir-fried bok choy or Chinese broccoli, but it’s definitely in its own category. On the outside it looks like a normal Western garden salad, but on the inside there’s a lot of Asian breaking loose. There was more to crunch on than meets the eye, a little bit of what tasted like roasted noodles or barley and maybe some dried fishy bits, all the more made better with the incredible vegetarian XO dressing. If garden variety is a negative term, they haven’t tried this bowl of green vegetables.

Gratuity is already included in all of the prices on the menu, so don’t be too put off by the $32 pasta that you’re paying for. Although come to think of it, even from an all inclusive perspective, that price did seem pretty steep. Nishi is definitely a high end restaurant, even if the uncomfortable backless seating and communal tables suggest otherwise, although that’s pretty consistent with the David Chang experience.


Momofuku Nishi
232 Eighth Ave (between 21st and 22nd St)
New York, NY 10011
(646) 518-1919