2 Years Later: Sushi Nakazawa and Cosme, Still Good

It’s always nice to see that a restaurant you really love but haven’t been to in awhile is still killing it several years later. I did a recent status check on two of my 2014 favorites, Sushi Nakazawa and Cosme, and I’m happy to report that both of these places are just as good as ever.


Sushi Nakazawa
23 Commerce St, New York, NY 10014
(212) 924-2212

chef daisuke nakazawa
chef daisuke nakazawa

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Sushi on Jones $50 Omakase

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What are you willing to do for cheap sushi? That’s a relative term, so to be clear, I’m not talking about sushi you get from a market or an average take-out place, I’m talking about freshly caught, high quality fish comparable to that served in a good restaurant. Would you be willing to give up good service, as long as the food comes out in a timely manner? Never mind the high strung host whose nerves seem to be getting the best of him from the moment you arrive and who keeps reminding you that you were 5 minutes late and were ruining their overwhelming operations of serving 4 other people. Or the fact that the same host with the stanky attitude who never offered you water and wanted you to leave as quickly as possible tried to upsell you on a $12 hand roll that you could take to go? What about your physical comfort? Are you okay with sitting outdoors on a small stool? It’s only 30 minutes, so not a big deal, right? This is how they do it at the Tokyo train station and the Tsukiji fish market! And speaking of 30 minutes, is this brevity something you can live with? It might even be quicker than that, maybe 25 minutes, I Dream of Jiro style, even though this is no Jiro, but as long as the sushi is tasty, it’s all good, right? You only paid $50 (only?) for such 12 premium pieces, what a steal!Read More

Shuko Sushi Kaiseki

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You might describe a sushi omakase as luxurious, long and expensive, but rarely is it ever fun. At Shuko, sitting through 29 courses of the sushi kaiseki is the most fun you’ll ever have. With rap music blaring on the background, the friendly staff plying you with drinks, and the sushi chefs answering questions like, “what’s your guilty pleasure?”, there’s no way you won’t have a good time. Read More

Sushi Lunch at Kurumazushi

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sashimi special lunch set
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sushi special lunch set

Midtown East, the exciting hub of financial firms, big corporations and Hale and Hearty chains, never had much appeal to me. But one thing that can lure me to that side of town are the many great options for a sushi lunch. Normally a sushi dinner at Kurumazushi, an old school veteran of the high-end Manhattan sushi scene, would set you back at least $100 a person, but the lunch is a more affordable option at $25 a set, $35 for sashimi only. Four different types of gleaming fresh fish and a bowl of miso soup arrive at your table in very efficient fashion, leaving you to enjoy a Michelin caliber meal without going over your lunch break. The location isn’t the nicest, and you will be surrounded by suits, but this is a small price to pay for a really good sushi deal.


Kurumazushi Restaurant
7 E. 47th St (between 5th Ave and Madison Ave)
New York, NY 10017
(212) 317-2802

Sushi Zo Omakase

inside sushi zo
inside sushi zo

Does the high-end sushi omakase market in NY seem a bit crowded to you? Shuko, Yasuda, Nakazawa, Neta, O Ya…and now there’s a new one to add to the list. Sushi Zo, a highly acclaimed LA based restaurant that tops all the best of lists in that city, seems confident that it has something new to offer with its $200 a head omakase. Chef Masa made the move on behalf of the LA team to run the east coast franchise, which is curiously located on the scrappy streets of Greenwich Village. The space has the standard minimalist look and feel of a serious sushi restaurant run by a control freak chef, but Masa-san is not one of those martinets who demand that you eat something in a particular way. He seems a lot more Americanized than most sushi chefs and hence engages comfortably with his customers like a peer, which makes for a relaxed atmosphere. No tense exchanges for mistakenly dipping your fish in soy sauce or not using your fingers.

tuna from north carolina, yellow jack mackerel, horse mackerel and red snapper with yuzu pepper
tuna from north carolina, yellow jack mackerel, horse mackerel and red snapper with yuzu pepper
halibut from long island
halibut from long island
spanish mackerel from long island with ponzu sauce
spanish mackerel from long island with ponzu sauce
amberjack from japan
amberjack from japan
flame grilled sea perch from japan
flame grilled sea perch from japan
sea bream with roasted shishito pepper
sea bream with roasted shishito pepper
medium fatty blue fin tuna from north carolina
medium fatty blue fin tuna from north carolina
scallop from hokkaido
scallop from hokkaido
monk fish liver from maine with ponzu sauce
monk fish liver from maine with ponzu sauce
chawanmushi
chawanmushi
black sea bass from long island
black sea bass from long island
uni from hokkaido
uni from hokkaido
salmon roe from alaska
salmon roe from alaska
white clam from washington state
white clam from washington state
live shrimp from japan
live shrimp from japan
anago sea eel from japan
anago sea eel from japan
sea urchin from maine hand roll
sea urchin from maine hand roll
tamago
tamago
clear soup
clear soup

In my opinion, what makes Sushi Zo different from other places is its technique of pre-seasoning its sushi with sauces beyond the typical soy, as well as a local approach to sourcing its fish. A lot of the fish was from Long Island or North Carolina, which I found to be very interesting, as other restaurants seem to fly in everything from Japan. And the quality of these domestic fish was very good and made me rethink the whole Japan is better mentality when it comes to raw fish.

I’m usually on the fence when it comes to pre-marinated sushi, especially when they get a little non traditional with the ponzu and the yuzu, because shouldn’t the fish be good on its own? But the sea bream with roasted shishito peppers convinced me otherwise. It’s definitely ok to dress up your fish a little bit. And I’m always a stickler for a great anago, a creamier and flakier eel than its fishier, freshwater counterpart unagi. I first had anago at Nakamura in Tokyo, and the one at Sushi Zo was just as dreamy.

By the end of the meal, I was completely stuffed and felt like I was suffering from gout. There were a lot of pieces in the omakase, but at the same time, it cost $200 a person, so you should be getting the whole sea at that price point. It’s hard being the new kid in town, especially one that’s full of more established sushi restaurants. I’m not quite sure if Sushi Zo’s style is distinctive enough or significantly better than the competition’s to consistently draw business its way, but Masa-san and his staff definitely deserve a closer look.


Sushi Zo
88 W. 3rd St (between Sullivan and Thompson St)
New York, NY 10012
(646) 405-4826